Mathematics: The Loss of Certainty

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Oxford University Press, 1982 - Mathematics - 366 pages
This work stresses the illogical manner in which mathematics has developed, the question of applied mathematics as against 'pure' mathematics, and the challenges to the consistency of mathematics' logical structure that have occurred in the twentieth century.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - encephalical - LibraryThing

The chapters on historical development are great. Math is so often presented as a fait accompli, it's nice to be reminded that it has a messy, non-linear history, just like every other human endeavor. The latter chapters on the state of math research as Kline saw it in the late 70s were tedious. Read full review

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wow good so good

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Contents

The Thesis
3
The Genesis of Mathematical Truths
9
The Flowering of Mathematical Truths
31
The Mathematization of Science
50
The Withering of Truth
69
The Illogical Development of a Logical Subject
100
The Morass of Analysis
127
The Predicament circa 1800
153
Logicism versus Imuitionism
216
The Formalist and SetTheoretic Foundations
245
Disasters
258
The Isolation of Mathematics
278
Whither Mathematics?
307
The Authority of Nature
328
Selected Bibliography
355
Index
361

At the Gates of Paradise
172
A New Crisis of Reason
197

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About the author (1982)

Morris Kline is Professor Emeritus at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University.

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